Category: wilrwliq

Gulls and Lions in showdown

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first_imgBy Russell Bennett WGCA PREMIER DIVISION REVIEW – ROUND 7 (Day One) TOORADIN v PAKENHAM ON paper, they’ve got arguably…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

Connacht Coach Andy Friend On Over The Line

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first_imgConnacht Coach Andy Friend joined Gerry Murphy, George McDonagh, Barry Cullinane and William Davies in studio on the award winning Over The Line as he looked at Connacht’s season so far and his plans for the province. Audio Playerhttps://galwaybayfmsports.podbean.com/mf/play/f5xgw9/Andy_Friend_Podcast.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Connacht face Leinster in the Pro14 This Saturday night in the RDS. Full Live Commentary from 7.45pm.print WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Emaillast_img

Digicel Cup top 8 to go to battle

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first_imgAt 2pm in Mendi is the game between the Mendi Muruks and Waghi Tumbe.This is elimination final with the loser to bow out for the season.The second elimination gets underway at 3pm at the National Sports Institute in Goroka between the home side Lahanis and the Mt Hagen Eagles.The first qualifying final will go down in Lae when the Lae Tigers play host to Agmark Gurias.This game kicks off at 3pm.Also at 3pm is the second qualifying final in Kundiawa.Here, the Hela Wigmen lock horns with the Simbu Lions.last_img

Can someone please pass headache tablet to President Granger?

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first_imgDear Editor,Republic Bank (Guyana) Ltd (RBGL) has this week released its unaudited half year 2017 performance as at the March 2017. That document clearly could not have been great reading for the shareholders, who I am advised are now principally Republic Finance and Merchant Bank Limited which according to Bloomberg is the merchant bank arm of the Republic Bank Group.What is concerning to me as a financial analyst is the state of the loan provisioning net of recoveries at this institution since 2015? Between 2015 and 2016, the ratio of provision for bad debt to the total loan portfolio deteriorated by some 23%. At the end of the 2016 financial year in September, loan impairment expenses net of recoveries was G6 million. But to really understand the effect of what is happening, one must consider the ratio of the loan impairment expense net of recoveries to total loans and advances between 2015 and the trended projection for 2017 (which is substantiated with 6 months of actual performance).From the graph below, one can observe the rapid expansion of the pool of good cash that has to be set aside to fund the write-off of potential bad loans in the bank’s loan portfolio. In 2017, this ratio of good cash set aside to fund the write-off of bad loans is expected to be slightly more than 1.5% of the total loan portfolio, compared to 1.1% in 2015 (see graph below).That is almost a 40% expansion in this ratio and cannot be great news for the shareholders.I have had cause to write about an even worst performance in their main competitor (GBTI) on April 8, 2017 and this discovery this week confirmed we do have a systemic problem in the banking sector. Houston, we do have a problem!It is now almost May 2017 and we are still awaiting the Annual Report of the Bank of Guyana for 2016 to confirm how much of the industry’s loan portfolio is categorized as sub-standard according to the Banking Supervision Guidelines. However, with the dataset at our disposal, we can confirm that with respect to RBGL, at the end of their financial year in September 2016, their non-performing loans to total loans were 11% compared to the industry level of 11.3%. Mind you the industry saw the quality of its loan portfolio deteriorate between September 2015 and September 2016 by 1.9% which translated to over $2.5 billion in debts being reclassified from “Acceptable” to “Substandard”. Some G$519 million (20%) of that figure came from RBGL, the biggest bank in the industry. This means that the smaller indigenous banks like Demerara Bank and Citizen’s Bank who do not have an international head office to back them up with capital will definitely be at greater risk than RBGL.What can be deduced from this situation? President David Granger has to wake up! This country is burning financially under his watch and he has to be held accountable for leading a team that seems hell-bent on driving the regression of the investment climate as they seek to build a new “BREED” of private sector players. As chief executive, he should not allow Minister Winston Jordan to continue to “bruk-up” and determine the future financial condition of this economy. President Granger should own up to his mistake and promptly correct himself by appointed someone who really knows how to frame an economic process and turnaround an economy. As I have said before, my choice in the Cabinet Room remains Carl Barrington Greenidge and I am sure as the desperation of the people increases, many in the private sector will quickly arrive at the conclusion that even Jaipaul Sharma would deliver a better investment climate that Winston Jordan.In the case of RBGL, post-tax profit declined by some 4% over their 2016 financial year to G$2.7 billion. If one look at these March 2017 published data from RBGL, one will recognize a trend that will see the loan portfolio growing at a quarter of the annualized rate that it grew in the previous year. How do banks make profits? Yes, the loan portfolio. What does that say about the profitability of this bank for 2017?Those who have eyes will see that not only GBTI and RBGL are in a conservative lending mode, the entire industry is and if the private sector cannot access loans then that single measure will do much damage to the economy in 2017 and beyond. Can someone please pass the a headache tablet to President Granger?Regards,Sase Singhlast_img read more

World Wildlife Day

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first_imgGuyana is a truly unspoilt and a relatively undiscovered paradise; this is one of the primary reasons that the destination was rebranded “Guyana – South America Undiscovered”. One of the destination’s greatest assets is its abundant flora and fauna, in fact, the country has become known as the land of the giants; it is home to several of the world’s largest species of animals, including the highest number of fish and bat (90) species for any area this size; the freshwater fish – Arapaima; the Giant Otter; the world’s largest pit viper – the Bushmaster; the Giant River Turtle; the Black Caiman; the Jaguar; South America’s largest bat – the False Vampire Bat; the Harpy Eagle and the Anaconda.The abundant wildlife continues to lure scientists, filmmakers and adventure seekers and have resulted in the production of countless documentaries and publications. Guyana, through its rich biodiversity and intact rainforest, was an inspiration for Arthur Conan Doyle’s “The Lost World”, and John Gimlette’s BBC production “Lost Land of the Jaguars” among many others. In fact with growing global concerns about climate change, Guyana possesses one of the most unique protected area systems on Earth – Iwokrama. The Iwokrama Canopy Walkway is situated in some of the world’s most species -rich rainforest. Wildlife that is regularly seen includes the red howler monkeys, spider monkeys, capuchins, mannekins, macaws, toucans, parrots, hawks, tannegers, trogans, puff birds, labaria snakes and butterflies.The Iwokrama Forest’s ecosystem is located at the juncture of Amazonian and Guianan flora and fauna. As a result, it contains high species richness and several species of animals that are threatened or extinct across most of their former geographic ranges, like the giant anteater. Of note, Guyana has an impressive list of over 800 species of birds and the Iwokrama Forest can boast to being home to about 500 species. With further studies, this list is expected to exceed 600 species.Then there is Mount Roraima, which is believed to have inspired the setting for Doyle’s 1912 classic “The Lost World”, where prehistoric creatures survived on a plateau. It certainly fits the bill. Defended by seemingly impenetrable 400 metre-high cliffs, the flat summit of Mt Roraima is home to many species found nowhere else on Earth. These endemic plants and animals have developed to be truly out of this world. Sitting on the border of Guyana, Venezuela and Brazil, Mt Roraima is part of the Pakaraima chain of flat-topped mountains, known locally as tepui.In fact, around 35 per cent of the species on Mt Roraima are endemic, such as the Roraima bush toad. And 70 per cent of those found on South America’s tepuis exist only on these plateaus. Other species are like living fossils, almost identical to plants and animals that are now extinct in the rest of the world. For millions of years, life has been existing completely independently on these mist-shrouded mountaintops, away from the prying eyes of civilisation.Iwokrama and Mt Roraima are just two examples of areas where wildlife thrives and where it is also protected. With regard to wildlife, Guyana is abundantly blessed and there is much to celebrate, particularly as World Wildlife Day comes around. Entrepreneurs too have long seen opportunities in Guyana for ecotourism and, more recently, the importance of forests in efforts to combat climate change has also been recognised.World Wildlife Day 2017 will be celebrated under the theme “Listen to the Young Voices.” As to the significance of the chosen theme, the United Nations pointed out that given that almost one quarter of the world’s population is aged between 10 and 24, vigorous efforts need to be made to encourage young people, as the future leaders and decision makers of the world, to act at both local and global levels to protect endangered wildlife.This year’s observation aims to encourage young people around the world to rally together to address ongoing major threats to wildlife, including habitat change, over-exploitation or illicit trafficking. Youths are the agents of change. Governments, law makers, enforcement officers, and officials across every region are scaling up their efforts to protect wildlife. Our country is celebrated internationally for our rich biodiversity; therefore, the responsibility rests with each of us to protect or wildlife and their habitats. We all have a role to play. Our collective conservation actions can be the difference between a species surviving or disappearing.last_img read more

Contractor charged for making false declaration

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first_img… allegedly had more than US,000 at CJIAA contractor was on Tuesday charged for knowingly making a declaration on an immigration form to be untrue when he appeared at the Georgetown Magistrates’ Courts.Clairmont Reid of Lot 197 South Vryheid’s Lust, East Coast Demerara, pleaded not guilty to the charge when he appeared before Chief Magistrate Ann McLennan.It was alleged that on June 6, at the Cheddi Jagan International Airport, Reid made an untrue declaration on an immigration form which stated that he was not carrying more than US$10,000, when in fact he had TT$139,135 in his possession – the equivalent of US$20782.22.The defence Attorney Paul Fung-A-Fat made a successful bail application, despite objections by the Prosecutor Deniro Jones. Reid was granted bail in the sum of $100, 000. The case will continue on September 8.last_img read more

LISTEN: Damien Comolli on how Dimitri Payet slipped through Tottenham’s net

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first_imgDamien Comolli joined talkSPORT on Friday and explained how Dimitri Payet slipped through Tottenham’s net.Payet was a revelation in his debut Premier League season after joining West Ham a year ago for £10.7million and has starred for France at Euro 2016.Comolli, Spurs’ director of football from 2005-08, says he has always been aware of the 29-year-old’s talent and held talks about signing the playmaker when he was at White Hart Lane.Speaking on the Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast, Comolli recalled: “Dimitri was playing for Nantes at the time [in 2007] and I had a phone call from the owner of St Etienne one evening when I was at Spurs. “He said: ‘we are about to sign this kid from Nantes for a lot of money as far as St Etienne are concerned, €4m, and we will only do it if you tell us in a couple of years that you will buy him for Spurs at €10m.“I said I don’t know where I will be, but I am pretty sure this player will be worth €10m in two years so you should go ahead with it.”Payet went on to impress in France, with St Etienne, Lille and Marseille, and has moved up a level since arriving in England.He is reportedly being eyed by Real Madrid, but Comolli says no offer should tempt West Ham to sell this summer.“You just have to see what is going in the transfer marker this summer to understand that prices are totally irrational so it is very difficult to put a price tag on a player. But, if I was West Ham, I would do everything in my power to keep him because he was such a key element in their season,” he continued.“The talent has always been there. He just needed to click mentally, to understand what was needed to succeed at the top level and to make the best out of the fantastic skill he has got.”last_img read more

U.S. aircraft sales predicted to slow

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first_imgWASHINGTON – Sales of military and commercial aircraft by U.S. manufacturers are forecast to grow at a slower rate next year, an industry group said Thursday. The Aerospace Industries Association’s annual report forecasts sales by Boeing Co., Lockheed Martin Corp. and others to rise, on average, by about 6 percent to more than $210.6 billion, with commercial planes, engines and other parts leading the way in 2008. For 2007, the association estimates that sales climbed 8.5 percent to $198.8 billion. That figure includes $92.5 billion in sales from foreign customers, an increase of $7 billion, or 8.8 percent, from last year’s $85 billion, driven by higher demand for commercial aircraft. Foreign sales of all U.S. aerospace products in 2007 rose for a second year, accounting for nearly half of the industry’s business. International demand for commercial aircraft was even stronger. As of Sept. 30, foreign customers had placed nearly three-quarters of commercial aircraft orders, which grew to more than 3,000. Despite a six-month delay in the launch of its new 787 “Dreamliner” plane, orders for it are coming in at a steady clip. The company landed 73 new orders for the plane during the third quarter. “There is pent-up demand among the domestic carriers for aircraft,” said Marion Blakely, AIA’s president and CEO.shrinking Pearl Harbor Survivors Association.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREPettersson scores another winner, Canucks beat KingsCivil aircraft, which accounted for 26.8 percent of industry sales this year, totaled $53.3 billion, topping last year’s $46 billion. That figure is expected to rise 13.3 percent to $60.4 billion in 2008. Tighter bankruptcy laws and hard lessons from the dot-com bubble have disciplined U.S. carriers to refrain from placing significant orders to recapitalize their fleets, said Richard Aboulafia, an aerospace analyst for the Teal Group Corp. “On the commercial side, there’s never been this kind of disparity before,” said Aboulafia, as U.S. carriers have struggled with record flight delays, rising fuel costs and obsolete aviation systems. Matt Grimison, a spokesman for AIA, said the industry is anticipating some level of purchasing by U.S. carriers next year. As of November, Chicago-based Boeing Co., the world’s No. 2 commercial airplane maker, had received 1,047 commercial plane orders for 2007, beating its 2006 record-setting 1,044 orders. last_img read more

Slow down to celebrate Advent

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first_imgWilkerson said he used to struggle with preparations like everyone else – buying gifts and writing cards while keeping up with his church duties. “You get to the point where you want to walk the other way,” he said. “But then I think, `I love the season,’ and I take some time each day to center myself.” The prophet Isaiah spoke of the new world to come, a world of peace where enemies would sit down together, the bishop said. The Old Testament story is a reminder of the peace, joy and contentment as the world awaits God’s promise of a savior. “When I found out I could hang on to that that, I found I can approach these tasks in a different way,” Wilkerson said. “When I write Christmas cards – I have to send a whole heck of a lot of them – each person I send one to, it’s an act of love. “The same thing with buying gifts. I don’t want to go in the traffic and the crowds, but when I think I’m doing this out of love, it changes my whole outlook.” One symbol of Advent is the wreath – traditionally built around three reddish-purple candles signifying penitence as well as royalty in anticipation of the savior’s birth; and one rose candle, lit the week of Christmas, to emphasize the joy of the Christ’s pending arrival. Some Protestant churches have switched to blue candles, symbolizing the night sky, to differentiate between Advent and the more solemn season of Lent, preceding Christ’s death and resurrection. Like many symbols of the season, the wreath, created in Germany in recent centuries, is an adaptation of a secular tradition: People of Northern Europe lit the candles during the cold, dark winter as they awaited the return of the sun. The Advent calendar is another mark of the season, mostly for children. Crafted of paper, cardboard or fabric and artfully decorated, the calendar has tiny doors that are opened each day of Advent, revealing religious pictures inside. The four Sundays of Advent celebrate hope, peace, joy and love. This Sunday marks the celebration of Mary and her humility in answering God’s call to Christ’s mother, Aitken said. “This Sunday it’s Mary’s song – the greatness of the Lord for Mary as she paints this picture of God lifting the lowly and honoring the poor – those the world doesn’t necessarily care about,” she said. “She proclaims God is doing this wonderful thing in choosing a young woman to bring God into the world.” Karla Devine is the artistic director at Trinity Lutheran Church in Manhattan Beach, and will present an Advent and Christmas concert on Sunday. The Advent songs in the church hymnal are her favorites. “There are such wonderful hymns and they’re so overlooked,” Devine said. The entire Christmas season, she said, is somewhat skewed, with Christmas Day viewed as the end, rather than the first of 12 days of celebration. “I love the season of waiting and preparing our hearts for the birth of Christ and waiting for the second coming of Christ.” pat.aidem@dailynews.com 661-257-5251 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! ‘Tis certainly the season to be jolly, but also to experience the true joy, anticipation and preparation for the real Christmas presence. Christians are in the middle of Advent, the four-week period of joyful waiting for the birth of Jesus. To the Rev. Amy Aitken of California Heights United Methodist Church in Long Beach, Advent is a time to pause, reflect and gather thoughts. “The season has been taken over by Christmas, that’s the reality,” Aitken said. “It’s taken over the whole notion there’s a season of preparing and watching. The time to slow down has been completely swallowed up by a culture that seems to start on Thanksgiving Day and go to Christmas in a supersonic mode.” AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWhicker: Clemson demonstrates that it’s tough to knock out the champAdvent traditionally begins on the fourth Sunday before Christmas Day – this year it started Dec. 2 – and ends on Christmas Eve. “Advent” comes from the Latin word adventus, meaning “coming” or “arrival.” The focus is on the pending return of Christ while celebrating his birth. Bishop Gerald G. Wilkerson, who oversees the San Fernando Valley pastoral region of the Catholic Archidiocese of Los Angeles, said he, too, is troubled that Advent has been minimized by the hustle of the holiday season. But he’s also learned to use his preparation for Christmas as a time to reflect on his faith. “Yes, you can get very, very busy with all the things that go on, but it’s really up to the individual to make the difference,” he said. “You have to take charge of your life. Even though there are all these forces, you have to take control.” last_img

Hart’s Foothill titles balm for tough week

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first_imgSANTA CLARITA – Hart High’s swim teams finally found something to celebrate Thursday, winning the boys’ and girls’ titles at the Foothill League championship meet at Santa Clarita Aquatics Center. It provided a bit of joy in a tough, tragic week that saw racial tension lead to rioting on campus and the death Thursday of Indians swimmer Molly Rogers’ mother, Debbi, from cancer. Valencia battled the Indians to the end, setting league meet records in both 400-yard freestyle relays, but Hart clinched its victories before the final event. The Indians girls, who competed all season in the Vikings’ shadows, relied on two victories each from freshman Jordan Danny and sophomore Rachael Krager to win the competition with 518 points. Valencia, which won the 200 medley relay in 1 minute, 56 seconds, and set the 400 free relay record in 3:45.08, was second with 483. The Vikings shared the title with Hart thanks to a 91-79 dual-meet victory during the regular season. “I wouldn’t trade those 400 free relays for anything,” Valencia coach Kathleen Perdisatt said. “Those made it all worth it.” In the boys’ competition, Hart (456 points) managed only two victories from junior Daniel Hofstedt, but its depth was too much for Valencia (363) and Burbank (360) to overcome, and the Indians cruised to their 10th consecutive finals triumph. “Especially after the week we’ve had, this is all about teamwork,” Hart boys’ coach Steve Neale said. “I can’t say enough about these kids and how they continue to rise to the occasion. This was sheer emotion and will and heart, what these kids did.” Hofstedt, selected the boys’ swimmer of the meet, held off Valencia’s Garrett Nugent to capture the 200 free in 1:43.97. He rallied in the final 200 yards of the 500 free to overcome Nugent and Saugus’ Ryan Kristensen – who won the 50 free in an area-leading 21.68 – to capture the title in 4:50.82. Valencia’s Kaleb Jenkins was the other multiple winner among boys, capturing the 100 butterfly (54.04) and 200 individual medley (1:59.41). Canyon’s Justin Wellins (100 free, 49.03), Valencia’s John Pedrini (100 breaststroke, 59.33) and Saugus’ Kyle Burns (100 backstroke, 54.63) won the remaining individual events in the boys’ meet. Burbank, competing in its final Foothill League meet before moving to the Pacific League next season, set a school-record in the 200 free relay, relying on a 21.86 anchor leg from Julian Miranda to win in 1:30.85. The girls’ meet featured double winners in Danny, Krager and Canyon’s Roxy Camuso. Danny clinched the meet for the Indians with her league record in the 100 breaststroke (1:06.85), extending Hart’s lead to 41 points entering the 400 free relay. “It’s been my goal since the first day of high school swimming (to break the record),” said Danny, who also won the 200 individual medley (2:13.36). “We worked hard for this, and we were all pumped up to beat anybody in a purple cap. And we did it.” Krager won the 100 butterfly (59.76) and 500 free (5:13.64) for the Indians, who overcame Valencia’s lead after the 200 medley relay and continued to build on its advantage as the meet progressed. Camuso, the girls’ swimmer of the meet, continued her unbeaten season in individual races, winning the 100 (54.28) and 200 (1:55.58) frees. She also rallied the Cowboys from third to first in the final leg of the 200 free relay to win in 1:43.89. “I had so much confidence on the block,” said Camuso, who helped Canyon to a third-place finish. “(Once I got in the water) I just couldn’t doubt myself. My goal was to break the 200 free record, but I still went my best time this season.” Canyon freshman Chelsea Griffiths set the first meet record of the day, clocking 59.53 to win the 100 backstroke, just off her area-leading mark of 59.07. “Winning the (200 free) relay made me feel a lot better,” Griffiths said. “I thought I was going to get (the record), but to actually do it is really exciting.” erik.boal@dailynews.com (818) 713-3607 AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBasketball roundup: Sierra Canyon, Birmingham set to face off in tournament quarterfinals160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more