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Three Payloads Built By CU-Boulder Set For Launch On Space Shuttle Atlantis

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first_imgCU-Boulder aerospace engineering sciences graduate student Christine Fanchiang shown with BioServe Space Technologies hardware, including a Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus and a cylindrical, fluid-processing device known as a GAP that will be used for microorganism experiments in low gravity aboard the final flight of Atlantis. (Photo by Patrick Campbell/University of Colorado) Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Categories:Science & TechnologySpaceNews Headlines Published: May 11, 2010 NASA’s space shuttle Atlantis will make its final flight May 14 carrying three University of Colorado at Boulder-built biomedical payload devices, including one to help scientists understand how and why slimy and troublesome clumps of microorganisms flourish in the low-gravity conditions of space.The experiments on biofilms — clusters of microorganisms that adhere to each other or to various surfaces — are of high interest to space scientists because of their potential impacts on astronaut and spacecraft health, said CU-Boulder’s Louis Stodieck, director of BioServe Space Technologies in the aerospace engineering sciences department. Their growth, for example, occurred in water purification and environmental controls systems on Russia’s Mir Space Station and was of regular concern.Led by Professor Cynthia Collins of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, N.Y., and managed by NASA’s Ames Research Center in Moffet Field, Calif., the experiments will target the growth, physiology and cell-to-cell interactions in microbial biofilms. The team will examine how the formation of the three-dimensional structure of biofilms formed by microbes differs in spaceflight versus normal gravity.Because astronauts show decreases in their immune systems during spaceflight, researchers would like to know more about how bacteria behave in space, including their apparent increase in virulence and resistance to antibiotics, said Stodieck. Such experiments have implications for astronauts on long-term space travel flight to places like the moon, Mars and beyond.The experiments will be carried aboard Atlantis in sets of specially designed fluid-processing apparatuses known as GAPs designed and built by BioServe, said Stodieck. Atlantis astronauts will control the individual GAP experiments using hand cranks to trigger and then later terminate cell growth via fluid mixing. The samples will be returned to Earth at the end of the mission for further study.The GAPs will ride inside BioServe’s Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus, an automated, suitcase-sized device developed at CU-Boulder that has been launched on more than a dozen NASA space shuttle missions, with two of the CGBA devices now on the International Space Station. BioServe is providing the hardware, integration and operations support for all Atlantis GAP experiments.A second experiment using BioServe hardware, sponsored by Astrogenetix, Inc. headquartered in Austin, Tex., and designed by researchers at the Durham VA Medical Center in North Carolina will analyze changes in virulence of two particularly nasty strains of bacteria in the low gravity of space. One, Salmonella, can cause illness and death to humans by tainting food or water. The second, Staphylococcus, can cause a variety of infections, including Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus or MRSA — a growing problem in hospitals and health clinics — because of its ability to resist antibiotics in the penicillin class of drugs.”Water quality, food safety and disease are age-old problems on Earth,” said Stodieck. Not only do these experiments have applications for keeping crew members safe by helping scientists better understand gene and protein changes in pathogens, they also could help researchers find new ways to prevent and control infectious disease.”A third experiment designed by the University of Florida will use BioServe hardware to study cell cultivation in a tropical plant known as Jatropha that produces energy-rich nuts, a popular new renewable crop for biofuels. The researchers will be looking for genes that help or hinder growth in tropical plant species to see if it could be commercially grown in “warm-temperate” areas like the southern United States.After the launch of Atlantis, the shuttle program has two scheduled flights remaining — Discovery September and Endeavour in November — before the fleet is retired. Stodieck said hardware and experiments built by BioServe are manifested on both missions as well as on future resupply vehicles traveling to the International Space Station from other countries. BioServe also has plans to fly hardware and experiments in micro-gravity on existing commercial rockets and on space vehicles now under development, Stodieck said.”It’s been quite an era for the space shuttle program,” said Stodieck. “But I fully expect we will continue to do research on the International Space Station – it will just require an adjustment in space vehicles.”Both undergraduate and graduate students play a role in designing, building and testing spaceflight payloads, said Stodieck. Master’s student Christine Fanchiang, who has helped to test the payloads, will be at Cape Kennedy, Fla., for the launch.”I had heard there were astronauts on the CU faculty, and then I found out that I could actually work with real spaceflight hardware at BioServe,” Fanchiang said. “I plan on getting my doctorate here in aerospace engineering, and who knows — maybe someday I can help to design and build lunar outposts.”BioServe also has flown several K-12 educational experiments on ISS, including seed-germination studies, crystal garden growth experiments and the life cycles of butterflies — all of which have provided learning opportunities for middle school and high school students around the world, said Stefanie Countryman. Countryman is BioServe’s business manager and coordinator of education outreach.BioServe is a nonprofit, NASA-funded center founded in 1987 at CU-Boulder to develop new or improved products through space life science research in partnership with industry, academia and government. Since 1991 BioServe has flown payloads on 35 space shuttle microgravity missions.For more information on BioServe visit www.colorado.edu/engineering/BioServe/index.html. For more information on NASA Ames visit www.nasa.gov/centers/ames/home/index.html.- CU –last_img read more

BlackBerry facing carve-up on “tepid” interest from suitors

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first_img BlackBerry sells smartphone IP to Huawei Potential buyers have shown only “tepid” interest in BlackBerry, eyeing parts of the business rather than the company as a whole, according to a Reuters report at the weekend.It noted that a “handful of potential bidders”, including private equity firms, are set to take a look at the company. But they are looking at assets such as the BlackBerry 10 platform (and presumably its QNX underpinnings) and patents related to keyboard technology.It has also been suggested that Fairfax Financial Holdings, the single largest shareholder, has approached several Canadian investment funds to explore a deal to take BlackBerry private.Reuters also said that some large private equity firms and “some of the Asian hardware makers” had decided not to become involved in the process.With the value of BlackBerry’s assets – including services business, patents, cash and investments – outstripping its market value, there are clearly some parts worth having.But its handset manufacture unit, which could cost $2 billion to close, provides a drag, and is likely to be the sticking point for potential buyers.Also concerning is that the recent strategic review announced by BlackBerry is not the first from the company – and its earlier talks did not come to fruition. This means that many potential buyers have already looked at its value, and decided not to strike a deal.The Wall Street Journal last week said that BlackBerry is looking to complete the sale of parts of its business by November 2013, following a “rapid auction process”. BlackBerry HomeDevicesNews BlackBerry facing carve-up on “tepid” interest from suitors Steve works across all of Mobile World Live’s channels and played a lead role in the launch and ongoing success of our apps and devices services. He has been a journalist…More Read more Steve Costello Previous ArticleFrench smartphone levy unlikely until 2015 — reportNext ArticleVodafone edges past 75 per cent target in Kabel takeover Relatedcenter_img Tags Devices BlackBerry future in doubt as TCL pulls plug Author AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 16 SEP 2013 Blog: Will BlackBerry mark-3 strike the right key?last_img read more

Assistant Professor – Industrial Studies, Safety

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first_imgThe Department of Industrial Studies is looking for a dynamic,full-time, tenure track faculty member in Industrial Studies withan emphasis of Safety in Manufacturing and/or ConstructionIndustries.Responsibilities for this position include observable dedicationto undergraduate education; enthusiasm for professional engagementwith students in and out of the classroom; and ability to work withcolleagues in a collegial environment to prepare grants, conductresearch, and seek external funding. Applicants will also have ademonstrated ability to interact with industry.A Master’s degree pertaining to construction safety oroccupational health safety is required.One of five units within the College of Business, Industry, LifeScience and Agriculture, the department has eleven faculty membersand about 471 students with up-to-date laboratory facilities andequipment in Russell Hall.  The department offers a B.S.degree in Industrial Technology Management with emphases inManufacturing Technology Management and Occupational SafetyManagement, a B.S. degree in Technology Education and a B.S. degreein Construction Management with emphases in Construction Managementand Construction Safety Management.More information is available at www.uwplatt.edu/department/industrial-studiesCampus Information: The University of Wisconsin-Platteville,founded in 1866, enrolls about 8,000 students in 42 baccalaureateand 6 master’s programs. It possesses institutional strengths inmiddle level education, engineering, industrial technology,agriculture, criminal justice and business. The campus is locatedin Southwest Wisconsin’s largest and most historic community. Theregion offers excellent school systems, high quality medical andhospital facilities, outstanding recreational opportunities, andvibrant businesses and industries. UW-Platteville is a cultural andeducational center for the Tri-State region of Illinois, Iowa andWisconsin.To ensure full consideration applications must be received byMay 9, 2021. Applications will be accepted until the position hasbeen filled.last_img read more

The upper house is prepared to contest legal aid reforms. Let us hope the lower house takes heed of its concerns

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first_imgLiberal Democrat peer Lord Carlile QC has a good record as a defender of legal aid. In his interview with Gazette reporter John Hyde he expresses concern over the implications of the cuts and predicts a difficult ride for the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Bill in the Lords. The upper house includes numerous lawyers with a wide legal experience. Many of them will share his view that if the effect of legal aid reforms is to create injustice which did not exist before, then parliament is not doing its job. A genuinely cross-party group in the Lords, he notes, ‘will fight’. But as Carlile acknowledges, all the Lords can do is create ‘some degree of ping-pong’ between the two houses. For supporters of legal aid, it is the Commons that remains the big worry, where traction for opposing these cuts has stalled. Carlile’s fellow Lib Dems in the Commons believe they are protecting fairness in this austerity-era coalition. Yet their ministers often seem too thinly spread, and ill supported, to manage this feat in all areas of state activity. If they did but realise it, legally aided citizens continuing to assert their rights would provide some reinforcements. Eloquent and principled resistance in the Lords would at least be a shaming wake-up call for Lib Dem MPs. Unless they rise and shine, support for effective social welfare law looks set to end.last_img read more

Tanning-bed limits up for first review in Colorado

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first_imgDENVER | This year’s attempt to block Colorado youths from tanning beds is up for its first vote in the Legislature.The bill would ban people younger than 18 from using tanning beds in Colorado without a doctor’s prescription. It’s up for its first hearing on Thursday in a House committee.The measure goes further than previous attempts, which sought to require parental permission for youths to use tanning beds.Health advocates have opposed efforts over the last two years to limit tanning, saying they couldn’t support anything short of an outright ban.___Online:House Bill 1054: https://bit.ly/1iWTbI3last_img